Lifelike 3D Models Could be Pivotal as Evidence in Injury Cases

May 14, 2019

Lawyers and doctor witnesses have been limited in personal injury cases to using radiological images like that of a Lancaster woman, left, to explain injuries. That changed in a recent civil case, where a 3D-printer-built head and neck arterial system, right, replicated that of the woman, hurt when struck by a truck in 2016. (John Hickey/Buffalo News, photo at right)
Lawyers and doctor witnesses have been limited in personal injury cases to using radiological images like that of a Lancaster woman, left, to explain injuries. That changed in a recent civil case, where a 3D-printer-built head and neck arterial system, right, replicated that of the woman, hurt when struck by a truck in 2016.

When a Lancaster woman was hit by a truck in 2016, the top neurosurgeon at Gates Vascular Institute was called to treat serious injuries to her head and neck.

Dr. Elad Levy was confident he could perform the procedures that would help her overcome the injuries. But he wasn’t sure he could lay out the steps he took when it came time to explain them to a jury.

“The anatomy and the injuries were so complex that I didn’t feel I could adequately explain them,” he said.

It turned out he didn’t have to.

A Buffalo personal injury law firm landed a $3.5 million legal settlement on the eve of the trial last month using a new form of evidence created on the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus: colorized 3D models made with the plaintiff’s black-and-white imaging scans that showed damage caused in the crash.
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